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College Admissions Intelligence

Spring Newsletter

College Admissions Intelligence

Spring Newsletter

SUMMER PLANNING

SUMMER PLANNING

College Admissions Intelligence is Collegica's blog, which you can access here.

Each of our periodic newsletters focuses on a specific aspect of the college admissions process. This edition is about summer planning.

College Admissions Intelligence is Collegica's blog, which you can access here.

Each of our periodic newsletters focuses on a specific aspect of the college admissions process. This edition is about summer planning.

They Know What You Did Last Summer

By Cassie Nichols

Admissions officers have a difficult job. In order to sift through the tsunami of applications that inundates their inboxes every year, they need to know as much about the people submitting those applications as possible.

That being the case, everything about the applicant matters, even how they chose to spend those precious summer months between high school years–months that used to be a time for sleeping in, lazing in the sunshine, and recuperating from the rigors of school.

(READ FULL ARTICLE)


Examples of Summer Activities

Get a Job - A summer of gainful employment will show colleges that you have the ability to make and meet commitments, and you'll earn some money as well. Some of the strongest college essays we review are about summer jobs.

Take a College Class - Sign up for a class at your local community college. Ideally, this class will be in a subject you already have interest in, or one that you’ve wanted to explore but is not offered at your high school. It might also make sense to take a class over the summer if next year’s schedule does not have room for everything you’re hoping to take.

Do an Independent Project - The sky is the limit here! But whether your project's goal is to develop your own mathematical theorem or build a yurt out of reclaimed Pepsi bottles, make sure that it aligns in some way with your broader interests. Independent projects also make great essay topics.

Volunteer - Donate your time to a local charity or outreach program. But again: make sure it makes sense in the context of your personal interests! (see video below)

Get Creative - Join a local theater, teach yourself to paint, or spend the summer making a movie. If you're leaning toward studying the arts in college, find ways to expand your portfolio.

Play a Club Sport - If you're enrolled in club sports, this might take up all your spare time. Many high school sports require summer training as well. Don't worry–this is time well spent, and colleges will view it as such.

Programs - There are many summer programs available, whether offered by schools or by third parties. While these are not obligatory (there are a lot of other options), structured summer programs can be a productive way to spend your summer. As with all of these suggested activities, however, try to make sure the program you choose makes sense in the context of your other interests.

Get a Jump on Things - For upperclassmen, one of the best things you can do during summer is to focus on college admissions-related activities, making your school year a little less hectic. We start working with our rising seniors on their college essays in June. And for juniors, summer is a great time to start prepping for any upcoming standardized tests.

Keep in Mind

Many rewarding summer experiences also translate into compelling topics for the college essay. This is another reason to make sure you do something meaningful over the summer.

Speaking of the college essay, that will be the topic of our next newsletter. If you haven't signed up for our newsletter yet (or if you know someone who might benefit from it), feel free to sign up below.


Summer Planning: The Video

Need guidance on summer planning?

We offer college admissions expertise to students and their families in the form of single (á la carte) services and counseling packages.

LEARN MORE

 

They Know What You Did Last Summer

By Cassie Nichols

Admissions officers have a difficult job. In order to sift through the tsunami of applications that inundates their inboxes every year, they need to know as much about the people submitting those applications as possible.

That being the case, everything about the applicant matters, even how they chose to spend those precious summer months between high school years–months that used to be a time for sleeping in, lazing in the sunshine, and recuperating from the rigors of school.

(READ FULL ARTICLE)


Examples of Summer Activities

Get a Job - A summer of gainful employment will show colleges that you have the ability to make and meet commitments, and you'll earn some money as well. Some of the strongest college essays we review are about summer jobs.

Take a College Class - Sign up for a class at your local community college. Ideally, this class will be in a subject you already have interest in, or one that you’ve wanted to explore but is not offered at your high school. It might also make sense to take a class over the summer if next year’s schedule does not have room for everything you’re hoping to take.

Do an Independent Project - The sky is the limit here! But whether your project's goal is to develop your own mathematical theorem or build a yurt out of reclaimed Pepsi bottles, make sure that it aligns in some way with your broader interests. Independent projects also make great essay topics.

Volunteer - Donate your time to a local charity or outreach program. But again: make sure it makes sense in the context of your personal interests! (see video below)

Get Creative - Join a local theater, teach yourself to paint, or spend the summer making a movie. If you're leaning toward studying the arts in college, find ways to expand your portfolio.

Play a Club Sport - If you're enrolled in club sports, this might take up all your spare time. Many high school sports require summer training as well. Don't worry–this is time well spent, and colleges will view it as such.

Programs - There are many summer programs available, whether offered by schools or by third parties. While these are not obligatory (there are a lot of other options), structured summer programs can be a productive way to spend your summer. As with all of these suggested activities, however, try to make sure the program you choose makes sense in the context of your other interests.

Get a Jump on Things - For upperclassmen, one of the best things you can do during summer is to focus on college admissions-related activities, making your school year a little less hectic. We start working with our rising seniors on their college essays in June. And for juniors, summer is a great time to start prepping for any upcoming standardized tests.

Keep in Mind

Many rewarding summer experiences also translate into compelling topics for the college essay. This is another reason to make sure you do something meaningful over the summer.

Speaking of the college essay, that will be the topic of our next newsletter. If you haven't signed up for our newsletter yet (or if you know someone who might benefit from it), feel free to sign up below.


Summer Planning: The Video

Need guidance on summer planning?

We offer college admissions expertise to students and their families in the form of single (á la carte) services and counseling packages.

LEARN MORE

 


Enroll in our free
College Admissions Bulletin Service


Our College Admissions Bulletin Service (CABS) is a free notification and reminder service to help students and their parents stay on top of college admissions deadlines and requirements.
 

To enroll, simply text your 4-digit graduation year to 31996. For instance, if you graduate in 2021, you'd text 2021 to 31996.
 

LEARN MORE

Enroll in our free
College Admissions Bulletin Service


Our College Admissions Bulletin Service (CABS) is a free notification and reminder service to help students and their parents stay on top of college admissions deadlines and requirements.
 

To enroll, simply text your 4-digit graduation year to 31996. For instance, if you graduate in 2021, you'd text 2021 to 31996.
 

LEARN MORE